sunday morning sociology, pride edition

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LGBTQ representation continued to increase in the UK (via the Monkey Cage). LGBTQ rights may present a barrier to the smooth functioning of the Conservative-DUP coalition, as the Conservatives have many prominent LGBTQ MPs, while the DUP remains staunchly anti-.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

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sunday morning sociology, bye bye paris edition

 

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Whatever minimum wage is in a given country, McDonald’s pays just more than that.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

This week, we mourn all sorts of things, not the least of which is US leadership (or at least, followership) on combating global climate change. Please post your favorite discussions of the events, especially by social scientists, in the comments.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, bye bye paris edition”

stata: roll your own palettes

I realize all the cool kids have switched to R, but if you still work with Stata, you may be interested in some routines I worked up to generate color and line pattern palettes and customize graphs fairly easily with macros and loops. This is useful to me because I am generating line graphs showing the trends for 17 different offense groups. Some preliminary tricks, then the code. Continue reading “stata: roll your own palettes”

sunday morning sociology, memorial day edition

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Cognitive biases, simplified and clustered by Buster Benson.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

This week’s a bit light on the links; hopefully everyone is getting a chance to enjoy the coming of Summer!

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on the interpretation of losses, mt special election edition

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Last night, Republican Greg Gianforte won a special election for Montana’s sole Congressional seat. How do we interpret this event? Here’s how the NYT approaches the question:

Voters here shrugged off the episode and handed Republicans a convincing victory. Mr. Gianforte took slightly more than 50 percent of the vote to about 44 percent for Mr. Quist. (President Trump won Montana by about 20 percentage points.) Mr. Gianforte’s success underscored the limitations of the Democrats’ strategy of highlighting the House’s health insurance overhaul and relying on liberal anger toward the president, at least in red-leaning states.

I believe this interpretation is incredibly misleading and reflects a larger problem with how we make sense of binary outcomes in the presence of more information.

As the NYT notes, in 2016, Trump carried Montana 56-36. The House race in 2016 was a similar 56-40. Gianforte here won 50-44. That’s a 10 point shift. In a special election. In Montana. And with something like 70% of votes being cast before the assault that brought national attention. Turnout was about as high in the special election as in the 2014 general. That’s wild. Yes, Gianforte’s awful, and yes that he will be a congressman is depressing. But framing this outcome as having “underscored the limitation of the Democrats’ strategy” or as a big loss for Democrats strikes me as absurd. If you are a GOP rep who won by say 10 in 2016 (55-45), this result should terrify you. And if you’re a Democrat looking at an even marginally competitive district, this should embolden you.

That’s most of what I wanted to say; the rest of this post is an aside about learning, probabilities, continuous information, and contract bridge.

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guest post: victim or villain? racial/ethnic differences in the portrayal of individuals with mental illness killed by police violence

The following is a guest post by Emma Frankham.

News reports about individuals killed by police have dominated the news cycle in the past few years. But how are individuals killed by police portrayed in the media? Are there racial/ethnic differences in media portrayals? If there are differences, what are the implications for public perceptions of these killings?

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sunday morning sociology, what a week edition!

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Via Pew, response rates for telephone surveys. Their report discusses the extent to which these low response rates seem to be biasing certain poll questions (not as much as you might think, they argue).

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

A lot happened this week. So, here’s a lot of links!

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, what a week edition!”