sunday morning sociology, post-asa edition

Watch Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s ASA presidential address at Vimeo!

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

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sunday morning sociology, asa edition!

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While observational studies suggested some impacts, new RCTs show that employee wellness programs don’t do much of anything.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Happy ASA everyone! Hope the conference is going well for everyone. Remember that the social media soiree/blogger party is tomorrow (Monday), 4-7pm, at McGillin’s!

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sunday morning sociology, climate change edition

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The Keeling Curve recording CO2 concentrations at the Mauna Loa Observatory.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, climate change edition”

sunday morning sociology, crisis in the humanities edition

Following the 2008 crisis, many fewer students are majoring in the humanities – and in the humanistic social sciences as well. Ben Schmidt analyzes the data here.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, crisis in the humanities edition”

the three temporalities of d&d

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Attention conservation notice: this post is a 1700-word reflection on running a good roleplaying game, inspired by debates in historical sociology. 

In 1996, William Sewell published one of the most important works in historical sociology, “Three Temporalities: Toward an Eventful Sociology” (working paper from 1990 available here!). The essay argued that classic works of sociology too often followed the wrong approaches to temporality. Iconic works of historical sociology often explicitly or implicitly invoked teleological or experimental modes of temporality. In contrast, Sewell argued that historical sociologists should instead approach temporality as eventful. Since then, historical sociologists have largely strived to do just that.

While thinking about Sewell’s schema for a paper I’m writing on Polanyi, I realized that the typology was useful for making sense of a very different context: roleplaying games (RPGs). In this post, I’ll briefly explain Sewell’s argument by showing how the three temporalities map onto three ways of playing D&D (or, really, any similar tabletop RPG). Unlike with historical sociology, I will not be making an argument that one way of playing is “better”, though I do think we can learn something from Sewell’s typology about why the modes of play analogous to teleological and experimental temporality are frequently unsatisfying, and about the ingredients of a good eventful campaign.

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guest post: grad school’s hidden curriculum

The following is a guest post by Jessica Calarco.

The idea of the hidden curriculum has a long history in sociology. As with most sociological terms (see also: culture, social capital, organization, structure, etc.), it’s easy to find a dozen different definitions floating around in the literature. In my own research, I talk about the hidden curriculum as the knowledge and skills that matter for student success but aren’t explicitly taught.

There’s a hidden curriculum at every level of schooling. From preschool to postdocs. In a recent thread on Twitter, I talked about the importance of uncovering the hidden curriculum. I talked about how important it is to talk about times we’ve been embarrassed or hurt by things we didn’t know.

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sunday morning sociology, by the numbers edition

“[College] football games increase reports of rape for women between the ages of 17 and 24 years by an average of 28 percent.” Econofact looks at the relationship between sexual assault and college football games.
A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, by the numbers edition”