new adventures in ubercapital

Marion Fourcade and Kieran Healy (2017) introduced the wonderful concept of ubercapital, “a form of capital flowing from [individuals’] positions as measured by various digital scoring and ranking methods” with consequences for stratification. Two new papers provide clear (and terrifying) analysis of how ubercapital works in hiring and law enforcement.

Continue reading “new adventures in ubercapital”

sunday morning sociology, hurricane harvey edition

Perceptions of probability (by a convenience sample from Reddit). Source

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

This week’s post features stories relate to Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath. At least no one has brought up this nonsense again.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, hurricane harvey edition”

guest post: “legacy” admissions vs familial capital and the importance of precision

The following is a guest post by @polumechanos

As questions about the future of affirmative action once again rise to the surface of the water cooler talk on the internet, there has been a concomitant rise in excoriations of legacy admissions as “affirmative action for white people” and “the real affirmative action.” Most recently, a freelance writer tweeted some of the results of The Harvard Crimson’s survey of the entering freshman class of 2021, focusing on a figure representing the percentages of students in the entering class who have various familial ties to alumni of Harvard College. Based on the survey data, Murphy reported that the percentage of legacies in the entering class is an eye-popping 41.2%. Shocking, right? (or perhaps not, depending on how cynical you are about elite higher ed).

But let’s take a step back, because there’s more than meets the eye with this figure and the accompanying tweet(s).

Continue reading “guest post: “legacy” admissions vs familial capital and the importance of precision”

open access sociology (or, publishing doesn’t need paywalls and doesn’t have to take forever)

FigurePropBarrons

Yesterday, Sociological Science published my new paper, co-authored with Ellen Berrey, The Partial Deinstitutionalization of Affirmative Action in U.S. Higher Education, 1988 to 2014. The paper is largely descriptive and the most important result is above – we show that lots of selective schools voluntarily abandoned their public commitments to the consideration of race in admissions, but not the most elite schools. Beyond that, we show that most of this decline cannot be directly attributed to state-level bans on the practice (85% of schools abandoning were not covered by such bans). In 1994, 60% of selective schools considered race; by 2014, just 35% did. Here, I want to briefly describe how the paper came into existence as a way to plug some of the new, open access routes to circulating work and publishing that have the potential to address some of sociology’s woes.

Continue reading “open access sociology (or, publishing doesn’t need paywalls and doesn’t have to take forever)”

sunday morning sociology, end of the summer edition

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-26 at 11.46.21 PM.png
A new working paper quantifies the effect of the famous HOLC redlining maps, finding that ratings led to significant demographic changes. Image from the NYT here, Chicago Magazine offers another take here.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, end of the summer edition”

guest post: should you go to grad school?

The following is a guest post by Daniel Laurison.

My first answer is read Tim Burke’s essay (where his short answer is “no”).

And then read Tressie McMillan Cottom’s essay on what’s wrong with blanket “don’t go to grad school” advice. That will link you to a series of tweets by Sandy Darity on why maybe you should go to grad school.

And then if you want, read this. My short answer is, it depends on who you are and what you want to get out of it.

Continue reading “guest post: should you go to grad school?”

sunday morning sociology, race and collective memory edition

whoseheritage-timeline150_years_of_iconography.jpg
A timeline of Confederate monuments, from the SPLC via Politics Outdoors

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

We here at scatterplot have run out of clever this week. Links below the cut.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, race and collective memory edition”