for most people, sociology is just as authoritative as economics

Sociologists engage in a lot of hang-wringing about the perception of the field. One theory goes that sociology is not perceived as scientific enough and, as a result, sociologists are not taken as seriously. The usual comparison is to economics, which is seen as both incredibly influential in policymaking and as being endowed with more scientificity by various actors.

In contrast, Beth Popp Berman and I, along with other scholars who study economists’ influence, have argued that the political power of economics (vis-a-vis sociology) does not run primarily through general public opinion about scientificity. Rather, we argue that economists are influential because of their role in particular policymaking institutions (like the Federal Reserve) and through shaping the mindset of policymaking elites (in law schools and public policy schools, say).

A new paper by sociologists Scheitle and Guthrie (S&G) provides evidence in support of this claim through a clever survey experiment (pdf here). Continue reading “for most people, sociology is just as authoritative as economics”

sunday morning sociology, monopoly edition

Screen Shot 2018-11-30 at 6.52.39 PM.png
Big companies are getting bigger, as David Leonhardt discusses in the NYT.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, monopoly edition”

sunday morning sociology, solar powered edition

kavlak_solar_pv_cost.png
Solar panels have fallen in price by 99% in the last 40 years, defying predictions time and time again. David Roberts at Vox expands on what this progress means for fighting climate change.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

 

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, solar powered edition”

sunday morning sociology, rising tides edition

Econofact looks at data on the distribution of growth across the income spectrum. In the 1940s-1980, rising tides lifted all boats. Since 1980, they have not.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, rising tides edition”

towards a sociology of race and x (for all values of x)

On Twitter, Elizabeth Korver Glenn asked:

This tweet produced a lot of great answers and interesting discussion. One thing that struck me in trying to compose my own answer is that beyond some really excellent work in the sociology of race proper (my answers were Golash Boza 2016 and Fields & Fields 2012), there’s also been a tremendous amount of fantastic work at the intersection of the sociology of race and various other subfields.

Continue reading “towards a sociology of race and x (for all values of x)”

sunday morning sociology

Sociologist Devah Pager passed away last week. The NYT chronicles her work and life here, including reproducing the above chart from her groundbreaking research on racial discrimination in hiring.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology”