the internet doesn’t want us to get along

Editor’s note added to a story in In These Times by a professor at Michigan:

Editor’s note: This article was originally titled “We Can’t All Just Get Along” in the print version of the magazine. The title was then changed, without the author’s knowledge or approval, to “It’s Okay to Hate Republicans.” The author rejects the online title as not representative of the piece or its main points. Her preferred title has been restored. We have also removed from the “Comments” section all threats to the author’s life and personal safety.

Author: jeremy

I am the Ethel and John Lindgren Professor of Sociology and a Faculty Fellow in the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University.

3 thoughts on “the internet doesn’t want us to get along”

  1. We’ll have to forgive the editors for transplanting the first line of the article, “I hate republicans,” into a sexier title. Nobody misrepresented this woman’s thoughts. http://www.nationalreview.com/article/395007/its-okay-hate-republicans-article-changed-we-cant-all-just-get-along-katherine-timpf

    People seem to think the format of the internet (clickbait, short attention span, etc.) is debasing content and people’s views. No way. The net has just made debate and broadcasting views cheaper, so we’re seeing more of the marginal view and debate, which are shitty.

    Imagine the shock and horror when the printing press made vitriolic pamphleteering common in the 18th century. “These heathens aren’t writing in Latin!” And yet, 200 years later, reading longish essays and newspapers as such is considered a mark of curiosity.

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    1. The interesting thing about the NRO piece is that when they quote the editor’s note, they omit the last sentence — the one about “threats to the author’s life and personal safety.”

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      1. I think National Review and Jeremy were both commenting on editorial and authorial decisions (punching up). Internet harassment is interesting, but I think ultimately an opportunity to turn people toward reasoned persuasion. The National Review piece actually fails that standard by intimating that Michigan should punish the professor. I think that’s the wrong way to go no matter the politics involved.

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