the official asa blog is launched

The ASA Council received an email today from President Paula England, who announces the launch of a new blog for ASA members: Speak for Sociology. England writes:

I invite ASA members to post comments on this new blog. It is a place where members can comment on ASA issues, and on public issues of particular interest to sociologists.

Members may want to use this space to talk about public sociology. We can discuss how to engage sociologists in public debates and get their voices heard. We can discuss the pros and cons of such engagement, including when ASA should or shouldn’t take a stand on public issues. And we can debate or brainstorm about ASA’s internal policies.

We are requiring those who post to provide their name, hoping that this encourages accuracy and civility, and discourages personal attacks.

Please initiate or join in discussions here!

Many of us, myself included, have been eager for ASA leadership to participate in our online conversations, and I think this is a great day for sociology.

korteweg and yurdakul, the headscarf debates

The Headscarf Debates: Conflicts of National Belonging,by Anna C. Korteweg and Gökçe Yurdakul, is a detailed and thoughtful work of comparative cultural sociology. It focuses on four debates in Europe about the wearing of headscarves (in all four cases, actually niqabs, misrepresented as burkas, as the book nicely explains). Using extensive analysis of media and legal discourse, it shows similarities but, more interestingly, differences among the debates in France, Turkey, the Netherlands, and Germany. These differences highlight persistent cultural differences in the relationship between state, citizens, and religion: differences the book describes as “conflicts of national belonging.”

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