one day you’ll hear the dulcet tones of jeremy’s voice, too

Long before Gang Leader For a Day (which I have yet to read), or his stint on the Freakanomics blog (which I occasionally do read), Sudhir Venkatesh was on This American Life. I forgot how much I liked this story, and this week they rebroadcasted it with an additional story on the economy.

It occurs to me that I have no idea what Jeremy’s voice sounds like, yet I have a voice for him in my head whenever we email or Google chat. In my head, he sounds like a mix of John Cusack and a young Bob Newhart. Likeable, folksy, but a bit sarcastic and jaded in a loveable way. Of course, in my head, my girlish voice has gravitas and sultriness, but I never said that I was right in the head.

8 thoughts on “one day you’ll hear the dulcet tones of jeremy’s voice, too”

  1. I don’t think that anyone likes the sound of their own voice. Adenoidal is not bad! Embrace your nasal passages! Better adenoidal than guttural. Or worse, cackly. Like Phyllis Diller.

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  2. My voice is also adenoidal. In fact, when I was in 4th grade I gave a presentation on the Civil War as Abraham Lincoln (I even dressed the part). At the end of the presentation, my teacher said it was incredibly creative, well rehearsed and informative, but she had to take some points off because my voice was too nasally. She suggested more time should be spent improving that instead of my content. I did not take her advice, and to this day have never heard a complaint–other than my own when I hear my voice recorded!

    Phyllis Diller is 91.

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  3. I don’t think that anyone likes the sound of their own voice.

    Yet, overwhelming behavioral evidence from seminars, talks, meetings, etc, suggests otherwise.

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  4. Peter@7: Jeremy is one of a select few who could graciously pull off wearing a Darth Vader voice-changer mask during his keynote speech as ASA president. Thanks for the visual.

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