the (dis)embeddedness of academic action in social structure

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Academics move around a fair bit. How do these moves affect the kind of knowledge academic produce? Over on Twitter, I speculated around this topic and a fair bit of interesting conversation ensued. Let me try to specify here a bit of what I had in mind.

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2019 junior theorist conference call for papers

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 11, 2019 BY 11:59PM EST
​The 13th Junior Theorists Symposium (JTS) is now open to new submissions. The symposium will be held in New York, New York on August 9th, 2019. The JTS is a one-day conference featuring the work of emerging sociologists engaged in theoretical work, broadly defined. Sponsored in part by the Theory Section of the ASA, the conference has provided a platform for the work of early career sociologists since 2005. We especially welcome submissions that broaden the practice of theory beyond its traditional themes, topics, and disciplinary function.

It is our honor to announce that Isaac Reed (University of Virginia), Amin Ghaziani (University of British Columbia) and Adia Harvey Wingfield (University of Washington in St. Louis) will serve as discussants for this year’s symposium. In addition, we are pleased to announce an after-panel entitled “Teaching Theory: Debates, Tensions, and Future Directions,” to feature Robin Wagner-Pacifici (The New School), Stefan Timmermans (University of California, Los Angeles), Shamus Khan (Columbia University), and Fabio Rojas (Indiana University, Bloomington). The symposium will also feature a talk by 2018 Junior Theorists Award winner Erin McDonnell (University of Notre Dame).

We invite all ABD graduate students, postdocs, and assistant professors who received their PhDs from 2015 onwards to submit up to a three-page précis (800-1000 words). The précis should include the key theoretical contribution of the paper and a general outline of the argument. Successful précis from recent year’s symposium can be viewed here. Please note that the précis must be for a paper that is not under review or forthcoming at a journal.

As in previous years, in order to encourage a wide range of submissions, we do not have a pre-specified theme for the conference. Instead, papers will be grouped into sessions based on emergent themes and discussants’ areas of interest and expertise.

Please submit your précis via this Google formFauzia Husain (University of Virginia) and Madeleine Pape (University of Wisconsin-Madison) will review the submissions. You can contact them at juniortheorists@gmail.com with any questions. The deadline is February 11, 2019 by 11:59PM EST. By mid-March we will extend up to 12 invitations to present at JTS 2019. Please plan to share a full paper by July 21, 2019. Presenters will be asked to attend the entire symposium and should plan accordingly.

Finally, for friends and supporters of JTS, we ask if you might consider donating either on-site, or via Venmo (handle @JTS2019, email address juniortheorists@gmail.com). If you are submitting a proposal to JTS 2019, we kindly ask that should you wish to donate, you only do so after the final schedule has been announced.

 

sunday morning sociology, racism in the uk edition

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The Guardian reports on racial discrimination in the UK. As in the US, racial discrimination in the UK appears to changed little over the past few decades.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

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sunday morning sociology, wage stagnation edition

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The Economist covers new research by Autor and Fournier about the stagnation of wages for Americans without college degrees and how, in particular, there is no longer an urban wage premium for these workers.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

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sunday morning sociology, 2019 first edition

“Of all stories mentioning Muslims or Islam, 78 percent are negative, compared with only 40 percent of those about Catholics, 46 percent about Jews and 49 percent about Hindus.” More discussion in the Washington Post.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, 2019 first edition”

how to support a friend writing a dissertation

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Currently, I’m one semester into what I anticipate will be two years of data collection for my qualitative dissertation. There is a lot of good advice I got in the first four years of my PhD to prepare me for this moment—memo often, get a writing partner or two, bring your questions and confusions to trusted colleagues (or Twitter), schedule regular massages to stave off repetitive stress injuries and chronic back pain. Still, there is one arena that I wasn’t fully prepared for and that’s just how much spending your days in interviews or participant observation can affect your relationships with the people you love most. I always knew that writing a dissertation could be an isolating experience, but I never understood that one reason why is that qualitative work is so unbelievably emotionally exhausting that you have nothing left to give your loved ones–even though you need them more than ever.

As I move into the new semester of data collection, I have reflected a good deal about how to do better at balancing being a researcher and being a fully-functioning and social human. On the top of the list is communicating more clearly with my friends, family, and partner about how dissertating can impact the relationships we’re trying to build and strategizing about how we can strengthen them anyway. Here’s what I intend to say:

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sunday morning sociology, 2018 in numbers edition

Number of refugees resettled in the U.S. falls below total from the rest of the world for the first time in 2017
Pew reports on 18 trends from 2018, including the depressing fact that “The number of refugees resettled in the U.S. decreased more than in any other country in 2017. That year the U.S. resettled 33,000 refugees, the lowest total since the two years after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and a steep drop from 2016.”

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

 

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, 2018 in numbers edition”