sunday morning sociology, american exceptionalism (the bad kind) edition

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Child mortality in the US is much higher than in similarly wealthy countries, in part due to poverty and guns. Source: Vox.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, american exceptionalism (the bad kind) edition”

submit your asa paper to socarxiv!

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The deadline for submissions to the American Sociological Association annual meeting is midnight tonight. So I’m guessing that many of you reading this post have either just submitted a paper, or are just tweaking that last bit of formatting before submitting. Once you’ve finally navigated the submission site (remember, one regular session and one section session, or two section sessions, but never two regular sessions!), why not submit your paper to SocArXiv as well? The submission process is straightforward, and interested readers will be able to access your paper right now instead of waiting seven months to hear your talk in Philly!

For details on the submission process, check out this quick tutorial. For more information, check out SocArXiv’s FAQ.

guest post: who hires whom?

analyzing from where sociology’s top 10-ranked programs hire their faculty

The following is a guest post by Michael O. Emerson, Provost, North Park University and Senior Fellow, Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

I remember when I decided to apply to graduate schools in sociology. I knew almost nothing about where to apply, so I met with my sociology advisor. He told me how sociology programs were ranked in a hierarchy, and that if I ever wanted to work in a top ten department I would need to go to a top ten program; if I wanted to work in a top twenty program, I would need to go to a top twenty program, and so on.

I took his advice to heart and earned my MA and Ph.D. from North Carolina, Chapel Hill, ranked then and now in the top ten. I ended up teaching for fifteen years at Rice University where we started a Ph.D. sociology program about six years ago (too early to be ranked), before becoming provost at my current university.

Although I have always found my sociology advisor’s advice to be qualitatively true, I often wondered how true it is quantitatively. Specifically, for professors working in the top ten ranked sociology programs, where did they earn their Ph.Ds.? Using the 2017 ASA Guide to Graduate Departments of Sociology, with just a bit of work, the answer is fairly straightforward. Continue reading “guest post: who hires whom?”

sunday morning sociology, women and politics edition

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Women are running for Congress in record numbers (source: DailyKos). 

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

It’s a slow news season (in some ways) and either still a vacation, the very beginning of the term, a major conference, or a frantic scramble to submit to ASA depending on your discipline and university, so the links this week are small in number and unsorted (but still, hopefully, high in quality!).

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, women and politics edition”

sunday morning sociology, nye edition

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According to a NYT survey and story, about a third of men admit to engaging in some form of gendered harassment at work in the past year, from sexist jokes to unwanted sexual attention.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, nye edition”

guest post: what the public thinks about denial of service to same-sex couples

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The following is a guest post by Landon Schnabel.

The Supreme Court is hearing a case—Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission—about whether a business can refuse service to a gay couple for religious reasons. But is this case really about religious liberty, or is it about something else?

In a national survey experiment with Brian Powell and Lauren Apgar, we asked Americans what they thought about denial of services. What they said surprised us.

Continue reading “guest post: what the public thinks about denial of service to same-sex couples”

sunday morning sociology, gender in economics edition

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Economics has a gender problem. Women are underrepresented, face a “Glass Ceiling” (higher barriers to tenure) and, unsurprisingly, are less satisfied than their men colleagues.

A weekly link round-up of sociological work – work by sociologists, referencing sociologists, or just of interest to sociologists. This scatterplot feature is co-produced with Mike Bader.

Continue reading “sunday morning sociology, gender in economics edition”