the poetry in sociology

We argue for a
sociology of health,
illness, and disease.

Few empirical
tests exist to address this
important issue.

Procedures used in
studies may blur or ignore
status distinctions.

The several studies
that provide such a test have
yielded mixed results.

However, recent
observations challenge such
a supposition.

The objective of
the present study is to
address this question.

This paper explores
potential limitations
empirically.

We also use an
improved method of dealing
with missing data.

This study is part
of a larger study on
infertility.

Data were gathered
in a random national
telephone survey.

Each variable
is treated as one test of
the hypothesis.

The direct effects
of race and ethnicity
were also revealed.

There is a sharply
stratified rank structure and
formal rules abound.

Results indicate
substantial differences
between families.

Children living with
single parents did not share
this substantial risk.

Variations by
gender and nativity
were also observed.

We discuss how the
results reflect doing and
undoing gender.

Size has a weakly
positive effect on both
change indicators.

The analysis
reveals selection effects
even in this case.

Second, the form in
which contact with the dead was
made varied greatly.

Similar findings
for diabetes and stroke
are also discussed.

Findings are discussed
and suggestions for further
research are offered.

These mixed findings will
need to be explored further
in future research.

Note: All haikus were hidden in the abstracts of sociological articles.

8 Comments

  1. Posted April 3, 2013 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    Of course, once you have a corpus of haiku, you can mix and match lines:

    data were gathered
    studies may blur or ignore
    formal rules abound

    results indicate
    which contact with the dead was
    undoing gender

    Like

    • Posted April 3, 2013 at 9:08 am | Permalink

      Once we start mixing and matching, we can bust out the rhyming:

      Recently, some have begun to actively question that stance.
      I identify three possible sources of this sociological ambivalence.

      Adaptive spiritual coping was tied to greater posttraumatic growth.
      We argue that social interactions are important for both.

      C. Wright Mills laid down a complex, contradictory legacy.
      But how do we define and measure resource dependency?

      This analysis revisits the Southern culture of violence thesis.
      The results provide mixed support for the contact hypothesis.

      In New Labor, sociologists have found a new public.
      However, they do not consider all original residents authentic.

      Like

  2. Posted April 3, 2013 at 9:07 am | Permalink

    I’d like to think that having NLP Python code create poetry out of sociology abstracts is your own “propaganda of the deed” contribution to the Biernacki symposium.

    Like

  3. The Chapel Thrill
    Posted April 3, 2013 at 10:49 am | Permalink

    my favorite of the originals is

    Data were gathered
    in a random national
    telephone survey.

    It’s like an epitaph for sociology. ‘random national’ has such a bite to it.

    Liked this a lot:

    Recently, some have begun to actively question that stance.
    I identify three possible sources of this sociological ambivalence.

    Like

  4. Posted April 5, 2013 at 9:22 am | Permalink

    I know this sounds crazy, but I am totally going to have my students write haikus to state their research findings. They think 5 pages is tough, try 17 syllables! This post is fabulous.

    Like

    • Posted April 5, 2013 at 12:04 pm | Permalink

      Jim Gibbon did this a few years ago as a blog contest but it doesn’t seem to exist any more on the intertubes

      Like

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